Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Jonathan Frid and Lady MacBeth, sort of . . .

Back in 1990 while I was living in New York, I was enrolled in two year intensive training acting school.  I was given the assignment of preparing a Lady MacBeth monologue.  One of the people who made tuition possible at this school was one of my chief employers, Jonathan Frid, who also had a lot of experience with Shakespearean plays.  I asked him if he would take the monologue I was given and show me how he would approach it.  He agreed and the 24 minute recording that follows is what he did with the speech.  I was not with him in the room so any remarks you hear are directed at me to hear when I got this recording.

I thought I would share it here, as it does provide some interesting insight as to how Jonathan approached acting and also how generous he was with his knowledge.



 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qzf73YO6y64




4 comments:

Linda Dachtyl said...

I really enjoyed listening to this, Nancy. Thanks for sharing. It's nice to read that Jonathan was so generous to you in many ways, too. :-)

femmeflashpoint said...

I found your blog recently. This was the first post I read, as well as listening to the recording.

It was excellent, and my sincere thanks to you for sharing. I think I may finally have developed a near-liking for Shakespeare, once more proving nearly anything is possible.

I'm looking forward to becoming more familiar with your work. :)

kelley arndt said...

Thank you for sharing this. I really enjoyed it! I have always been an admirer of Jonathan frid and have enjoyed learning more about him from you.

Karen van Hoek said...

I adore this recording so much, I can hardly express it. God bless you for sharing it. I put it on my iPod, and I actually stopped at multiple points to savor what I had heard and save some for the next day, so it took me four days to get to the end. I love hearing how Jonathan's mind works (I hope it's OK to call him by his first name, though I never knew him). The way he expresses himself and comes up with insights so nimbly -- it's captivating. I wish he'd recorded an entire audio course on his approach to Shakespeare, or acting, or whatever popped into his head, actually. This recording is a treasure.